Archive for January, 2011

Metropolitan Hilarion’s Part 7

Posted in Meditative on January 31, 2011 by readerjohn

I don’t know how long Metropolitan Hilarion’s address was, but part 7 has appeared today (after several more I haven’t linked to – you should be able to find the readily at Preachers Institute).

Today’s installment refers to the “ceremony” of the Liturgy, especially the Hierarchical Divine Liturgy.

Thin Places

Posted in Meditative on January 29, 2011 by readerjohn

I’m reminded within the last day of the Celtic view that earth has some “thin places” — places where heaven’s a little closer than elsewhere.

It seems to me that the sanctuary of Saint Alexis is one of those places on Sunday morning.

The Divine Liturgy (Metropolitan Hilarion Part 5)

Posted in Meditative on January 29, 2011 by readerjohn

Part 5 of Metropolitan Hilarion’s “Orthodox Worship As A School Of Theology” has appeared at Preachers Institute. He opens with fans of the sacrament factory who’d like to see a 30-minute Speed Liturgy.

Slave, bargainer, son

Posted in Meditative on January 29, 2011 by readerjohn

As the Pilgrim states: “according to the Holy Fathers, one who performs saving works simply from the fear of Hell follows the way of bondage, and he who does the same just in order to be rewarded with the Kingdom of Heaven follows the path of a bargainer with God.  The one they call a slave, the other a hireling.  But God wants us to come to Him as sons to their Father.”

(Devotional on Luke 16:10-15, Dynamis)

How is Orthodoxy like New York City?

Posted in Meditative on January 29, 2011 by readerjohn

Father Gregory Jensen at the Koinonia blog strikes a cautionary note about contentiousness in the Church.

Still more reflections on liturgical texts

Posted in Meditative on January 28, 2011 by readerjohn

Part 4 of Metropolitan Hilarion’s “Orthodox Worship As A School Of Theology” has appeared at Preachers Institute. In this part, he addresses “uncanonical” services such as Moleibens and Akathists:

We can say that processes are taking place in the Russian Church similar to those that occurred in Protestantism and Catholicism at various periods, during which ancient, theologically rich, liturgical texts were replaced by more easy-to-understand chorales, hymns and chants …. treasures of theological content were sacrificed for the sake of ease of comprehension. As a result, their services ceased to be a school of theology and meditation on God and remained at most a school of piety.

He offers an antidote for those of us in parishes where it’s impractical to serve, or impractical for believers to attend, a full, monastic-type cycle of services: to read liturgical books at home.

Fortunately, many are available online. Anastasis (Archimandrite Ephrem Lash) and Monachos are two instances. At some point in the past, I also got an English Menaion, suitable for study if not for liturgical use.

 

Test Post

Posted in Uncategorized on January 28, 2011 by therealbaum

Test Post

-Ellie